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20121027
20121104
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KRCB (PBS) 4
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
. actually, they had a negotiation to change. they went from, there was an old gm and a new gm, so they went through kind of a managed bankruptcy after all the bailout work was done. >> then ford did it all on their own. >> wait, this is not true. that is not true. ford had the timing on their side. they went and renegotiated their debt before the 2008 crisis hit. they happened to have an advantage of going to wall street to renegotiate their borrowing authority and it was the calendar. >> the ceo of ford said about mitt romney's prescription. he said if gm and chrysler had gone into a free fall bankruptcy, they would have taken the entire supply chain and auto agency with it. he said that in 2010. so that's really what -- >> speculation is not accurate. >> it is because there was no way that private capital were going to keep those companies alive into a chapter 11 reorganization. they would have gone into liquidation. we would have lost not only those two companies, but the supply chain. >> what he said, these are his words, the american auto industry is vital to our national interest as e
jobs, and not just at gm, chrysler and their dealerships, but in auto parts manufacturing all over the country. >> reporter: today the lords town plant churns out the chevrolet cruz, the country's best selling compaq car, to meet demands it's gone from one shift a day to three, and round-the-clock production. dave green is president of the local united auto workers union. >> but the whole economy will benefit from this because our parts suppliers, the people who work there are out shopping at the stores, they are paying tacks, you know, they're investing in their community. >> reporter: the auto industry employs one out of every eight workers in the state. youngstown is the largest city in the region and reaped many of the benefits. it's not just auto breathing new life into northeast ohio. in youngstown, the once declining steel industry has come back. and the evidence is french-owned bn m-star which makes field tube force natural gas drilling. the company chose youngstown for its $1 billion expansion. you might not think of ohio as an energy powerhouse, but it is on the verge of
assert general motors and chrysler are adding jobs in china at the expense of workers in ohio. both g.m. and chrysler have protested. but the romney campaign insists the facts in the ads are accurate. syrian government forces stepped up widespread air assaults on opposition strongholds today, anti-government activists said, after a holiday ceasefire fell apart. amateur video showed mig fighter jets strike near a mosque on the outskirts of damascus. warplanes also pounded the north, in towns including dair al zour. two days of bombing have left at least 185 people dead. meanwhile, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton called for a shakeup of the syrian opposition in its bid to oust president assad. she said it should include people who've been fighting on the front lines, not just activists who've lived outside of syria for decades. in china, a government think tank urged leadership to end the country's one-child policy. it recommends each family be allowed to have two children by 2015, and by 2020 all limits be dropped. the one-child policy was introduced in 1980 to help curb china's
impact these companies, and the idea that you can be at gm or ford for your entire career, people now realize that's not as clear. and so they're more open to other opportunities. now, some of it there's, obviously, different skill sets. some of it is getting the people that do have that creative, innovative spirit to recognize there is an opportunity with some of the companies developing here. even more importantly is how to you get the folks that left detroit to come back here. i'm sure there's thousands, probably tens of thousands of people who that are born and rad here or went to one of the universities in this area who'd love to come back here but really decided to leave because they felt there wasn't a future. that pool of talent, drawing them back, i think, is also a big opportunity. but it really is all about talent. it's an idea plus capital, as josh said. but the most important ingredient is talent. >> you know, one of the things that's also an important ingredient is training and education. i just don't want this section sort of launching our day to get finished without di
consider themselves manufacturers. is it possible to great the gm in your garage now? mark? >> absolutely. so some things people don't necessarily realize today. the cost of a computer numberically controlled is come down something on the order of 95%. we are training how to use the classes. they are not world class at the end of the session. if you are patrick buckley and you want to do an ipad case and take three cases, ninety cays later, you could have like he did a million dollar company. they did $3 in the second year. $10 million year. square did the original three prototypes. they are doing fine. it has gotten smaller. typical when you do a software start-up, now you need $75,000. you can do a hardware start-up for the same kind of money. we had doesn't and dozens of crowd-funded project come through from 10,000 to $100,000 that got them through the prototype stage the first run in manufacturing nap is new to the world. you haven't been able to do that for the kind of price points. den nay all kinds of amazing projects on indy go go to my favorite one rented one is the building --
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)